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Case-Based Learning (CBL)

TAKEN DIRECTLY FROM EDUTECHWIKI

“Case-based learning (CBL) is an instructional design model that is a variant of project-oriented learning. It is popular in business and law schools. CBL in a narrow sense is quite similar to to problem-based learning, but it may also be more open ended as in our definition of project-based learning. It is not close to what we called Project-methodology-based learning.

According to the Case-based Learning page of the Center for Instructional Development & Distance Education , retrieved 19:35, 11 October 2007 (MEST), “Cases are factually-based, complex problems written to stimulate classroom discussion and collaborative analysis. Case teaching involves the interactive, student-centered exploration of realistic and specific situations. As students consider problems from a perspective which requires analysis, they strive to resolve questions that have no single right answer.”

Note: CBL is also a subfield of artificial intelligence. Case-based learning as technology can be found in advanced systems like Intelligent tutoring systems, e.g. to find stories to support reasoning (Jonassen & Hernandez-Serrano, 2002)

In an earlier (now unavailable) version [1], CIDDE, defines Case-based learning (CBL) as “instruction by the use of stories about individuals facing decisions or dilemmas”and was characterized as follows:

Features
  • learner-centered
  • Collaboration and cooperation between the participants
  • discussion of specific situations, typically real-world examples.
  • questions with no single right answer.
Students
  • engaged with the characters and circumstances of the story.
  • identify problems as they perceive it
  • connect the meaning of the story to their own lives.
  • bring their own background knowledge and principles.
  • raise points and questions, and defend their positions.
  • formulate strategies to analyze the data and generate possible solutions.
  • may not agree, and sometimes a compromise is reached.
Teacher
  • facilitator
  • encourages exploration of the case and consideration of the characters’ actions in light of their own decisions.
Cases
  • factually-based
  • complex problems written to stimulate classroom discussion and collaborative analysis.
  • involves the interactive, student-centered exploration of realistic and specific situations.

Cases have traditionally been used to teach decision making skills in professional education. More recently, cases are being used for learning medical science in PBL. The medical school use of cases differs from that in other professional schools in that PBL focuses on medical subject matter content more so than on decision-making.”